Web 2.0 … The Machine is Us/ing Us

Mike Wesch, assistant professor at Kansas State University. His take on how the Internet and Web 2.0 have changed everything.

Digital Humanities and the case for Critical Commons

The 2010 Digital Media and Learning Competition challenges designers, entrepreneurs, practitioners, researchers and young people to put participatory learning to work on behalf of science, technology, engineering, math and their social contexts in the 21st century. Awards will total $2 million.

The Digital Media and Learning Competition is funded by a grant from the MacArthur Foundation to the University of California Humanities Research Institute and Duke University and is administered by the Humanities, Arts, Science and Technology Advanced Collaboratory (HASTAC), a virtual network of learning institutions. The competition is part of MacArthurs digital media and learning initiative, which is designed to help determine how digital technologies are changing the way young people learn, play, socialize, and participate in civic life. Answers are critical to education and other social institutions that must meet the needs of this and future generations.

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Lola Papazoglou anthropologists and filmmakers, check out lucien taylor’s new film:

The Official Sweetgrass Trailer

Assessing the Future Landscape of Scholarly Communication: An Exploration of Faculty Values and Needs in Seven Disciplines.

The full report can be accessed at: http://escholarship.org/uc/cshe_fsc

Since 2005, the Center for Studies in Higher Education (CSHE), with generous funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, has been conducting research to understand the needs and practices of faculty for in-progress scholarly communication (i.e., forms of communication employed as research is being executed) as well as archival publication.

The final report brings together the responses of 160 interviewees across 45, mostly elite, research institutions in seven selected academic fields: archaeology, astrophysics, biology, economics, history, music, and political science. Our premise has always been that disciplinary conventions matter and that social realities (and individual personality) will dictate how new practices, including those under the rubric of Web 2.0 or cyberinfrastructure, are adopted by scholars. That is, the academic values embodied in disciplinary cultures, as well as the interests of individual players, have to be considered when envisioning new schemata for the communication of scholarship at its various stages.

Links to the complete results of our ongoing work can be found at the Future of Scholarly Communication’s project website.

Top 10 reasons why the iPad is not on my shopping list

In progress…

1. No Flash. This is being worked on my Adobe, but no flash is a deal breaker. 75% of video content on the web is Flash based.

2. No Camera. This means no video chat, no quick notes, no using the apps that require visual input.

3. No Ports. Other than the propreitary apple usb 30 pin connector, no way to put things ‘in’ to the iPad than wireless connnections.

4. No OS X. Yeah, it’s kinda OS X, but it’s iPhone OS, and won’t run Photoshop anytime soon. Or any of my other apps for that matter.

5. No multi-tasking. The iPad is a big iPhone, and like it’s little sibling, can’t do more than one thing at a time. So you can’t work on your iWork presentation and listen to Pandora at the same time.

6. Closed for development. Typical Apple, the platform is locked down and the only way in is the app store. Granted, the app store is very cool, but the iPad is not going to be a laptop replacement for any serious computer user. Fine for the MS Office and email crowd.

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I am in the midst of reprising our VAST 2009 paper on the Last House on the Hill project and was inspired by the, er, vast amount of media on the web about Catalhoyuk. I desperately needed to procrastinate, so made a quick ScreenFlow video about the 28,000 Google Images on the site. Try the video search, too.

Holy Crap. My name is #17/#18 on the dumbest password list. Awesome.
Check the NY Times article here.

Holy Crap. My name is #17/#18 on the dumbest password list. Awesome.

Check the NY Times article here.

As we went through the Anthropology 230 course themes for Doing Audio-Visual Archaeology, a couple things came to mind that would be fun to think about, or act upon. In my other work, I’m tracking the techno-trend of better/bigger HD content on the one hand with smaller/mobile content on the other.

For digital archaeology, there’s never been a better time to experiment with both. Digital cameras, still or video or hybrid, produce spectacular quality content with relative ease. Editing tools such as the free iLife suite installed on every Apple Mac are super easy to use. iPhone apps are location aware, so pictures and videos can be geolocated automatically.
I’d like us to consider adding a theme on Mobile Archaeology, and how mobile technology can be used to both ‘do’ and ‘talk’ archaeology.
The app warning parrots Ruth’s sentiments and aims for this course, and for our discipline. The more we can ‘do’ audio-visual, mobile, multi-sensory archaeology, the more it will be OK and the less authoritarians will be able to disallow the rich and creative possibilities to happen. Mobile Archaeology puts the message right in front of our audiences, so it’s worth exploring how we can package our efforts for this medium.

As we went through the Anthropology 230 course themes for Doing Audio-Visual Archaeology, a couple things came to mind that would be fun to think about, or act upon. In my other work, I’m tracking the techno-trend of better/bigger HD content on the one hand with smaller/mobile content on the other.

For digital archaeology, there’s never been a better time to experiment with both. Digital cameras, still or video or hybrid, produce spectacular quality content with relative ease. Editing tools such as the free iLife suite installed on every Apple Mac are super easy to use. iPhone apps are location aware, so pictures and videos can be geolocated automatically.

I’d like us to consider adding a theme on Mobile Archaeology, and how mobile technology can be used to both ‘do’ and ‘talk’ archaeology.

The app warning parrots Ruth’s sentiments and aims for this course, and for our discipline. The more we can ‘do’ audio-visual, mobile, multi-sensory archaeology, the more it will be OK and the less authoritarians will be able to disallow the rich and creative possibilities to happen. Mobile Archaeology puts the message right in front of our audiences, so it’s worth exploring how we can package our efforts for this medium.

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